Friday, January 27, 2023

Rape Crisis leader awarded OBE

THE RESPECT THAT South Essex Rape and Incest Crisis Centre (Serric) is given was underlined today as staff member Lee Eggleston was awarded an OBE in the Queens Honours List.

South Ockendon-based Lee received the award for services to issues affecting women.

Lee has worked for Serric for several years and has campaigned on a number of issues regarding sexual violence helping Serric gain the national and indeed international reputation it so richly deserves.

Three years ago, Lee travelled to the United Nations in New York to speak on behalf of Serric at a world conference.

Deputy leader of Thurrock Council, cllr Val Morris-Cook said: “I am delighted that Lee has received this recogntion. Every family, every woman and every child who has been helped by Lee will attest to the value of her work over the years.”

68 COMMENTS

  1. I couldn’t be prouder for Lee Eggleston at this moment – in fact it is a very small gesture for the Work and Commitment she – and Sheila – have put into very difficult professional challenges – (in the nature of the problems for the Victims they serve) – there are very few people who could rise to such challenges. An Honour goes only so far to recognise the real bravery and guts these two Thurrock Women have – and I do mean that. They should have ALSO been given the Freedom of the Borough accolade – they earned that a million times over. IF only mealy mouthed-spineless-knee jerking-back biting petty minded arrogant-virtually empty councillors could LEARN to have HALF the insight these 2 Great Women have – this Borough would be a far better place for all to live – and I do mean that too – and with far more well spent funding left over to help worthy causes such as they took on. My admiration and awe is indefinable. Long Live Lee and Sheila – all Honour is yours – well earned and deserved.

  2. […] Lee Eggleston was 14, and still at school, when she first heard about theRape Crisis movement in the late 1970s. She had joined a CND group in Thurrock, Essex, from which a group of women soon branched off, including her and Sheila Coates, a young mother of two. “At one meeting,” says Coates, “all the women were talking about sexual violence, and it was quite a shock. We’d all known each other for some time, but no one was aware that everyone in the room had had something happen, be it flashing or rape. No one had told anybody.” […]

  3. […] Lee Eggleston was 14, and still at school, when she first heard about the Rape Crisis movement in the late 1970s. She had joined a CND group in Thurrock, Essex, from which a group of women soon branched off, including her and Sheila Coates, a young mother of two. “At one meeting,” says Coates, “all the women were talking about sexual violence, and it was quite a shock. We’d all known each other for some time, but no one was aware that everyone in the room had had something happen, be it flashing or rape. No one had told anybody.” […]

  4. […] Lee Eggleston was 14, and still at school, when she first heard about the Rape Crisis movement in the late 1970s. She had joined a CND group in Thurrock, Essex, from which a group of women soon branched off, including her and Sheila Coates, a young mother of two. “At one meeting,” says Coates, “all the women were talking about sexual violence, and it was quite a shock. We’d all known each other for some time, but no one was aware that everyone in the room had had something happen, be it flashing or rape. No one had told anybody.” […]

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