Thurrock mother who lost her son over gambling debts welcomes plans over Fixed Odds Betting Terminals

Oliver Scott

THE mother of much-loved Oliver Scott who took his own life after getting into financial difficulties has welcomed proposals to reduce the stakes for controversial fixed odd terminals.

North Stifford resident Oliver Scott died in 2012, at the age of 18. Oliver had just started working at Harris Academy in Chafford Hundred, where he was immensely popular.

Since Oliver’s death, Dawn Scott, of Harrington Crescent, North Stifford, has campaigned to raise awareness of the risks with fixed odds betting terminals, that have been described as the “crack cocaine of betting”.

Proposals could mean that the maximum stake for fixed-odds betting terminals could drop to as little as £2 under a government review.

Currently, people can bet up to £100 every 20 seconds on the high-speed electronic casino games but proposals could limit that to between £2 and £50.

The 12-week government consultation aims to reduce the risk of people suffering large losses and to tighten up advertising rules.

YT spoke to Dawn about the proposals.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.