Saturday, April 13, 2024

Unions press for recognition at DP World

UNIONS have raised concerns about union rights at DP World in Stanford-le-Hope.

Unite believes that the apparent refusal by the port’s owners – Dubai-based DP World to recognise the union will mean a “race to the bottom in terms of employment conditions” which could threaten the future viability of the container ports at Felixstowe and Southampton, as well as at Thamesport.

Unite said that union recognition always reinforces health and safety issues – and docks remain one of the most dangerous industries to work in.

The London Gateway is due to open later this year and is already recruiting for the 2,500-strong workforce, the majority of which would be dockers.

Unite regional officer Jane Jeffery said: “We have held a number of meetings with Gateway’s management and they are clear that they will not be recognising a trade union prior to the port opening. We call on them to rethink this stance.

“There is already overcapacity in the UK’s container ports and we believe that this port should not be opened with the current overcapacity nationally.

“The London Gateway is not looking to create new work and there is a very real possibility that the jobs it creates will be lost elsewhere, with the new jobs on inferior terms and conditions.

“Union recognition has proved to be vital in promoting health & safety issues in workplaces across the UK – the fact DP World does not want to recognise Unite does not auger well for health and safety in what remains one of the UK’s most dangerous industries.

DP World has stressed it wants to give employees a choice rather than prescribing membership of a particular union.

A spokesperson said: “We have responded that membership of any union, including Unite, would be a free choice matter for London Gateway employees to decide upon and if membership of one or more unions reached the level where recognition was applicable then we would be happy to do so.

“We are very happy to discuss this matter with any party.”

A UNION says it is concerned about wages and working conditions at the new £1.5billion superport.

Unite said the refusal of London Gateway – the new deep-sea container port being built in the Thames estuary – to recognise the union will mean a race to the bottom in terms of employment conditions.

The largest union in the country said recognition will reinforce health and safety issues.

But DP World said it wants to give employees a choice rather than pre-determining membership of a particular union. London Gateway is due to open later this year and is already recruiting for its 2,500-strong workforce.

Jane Jeffery, Unite regional officer, said: “We have held a number of meetings with Gateway’s management and they are clear they will not be recognising a trade union prior to the port opening.

“We call on them to rethink this stance.

“Union recognition has proved to be vital in promoting health and safety issues in workplaces across the UK – the fact DP World does not want to recognise Unite does not auger well in what remains one of the UK’s most dangerous industries.

“This is doubly worrying given that the Government is trying to whittle down health and safety regulations.”

A spokesman for DP World said membership of any union would be down to their employees and it takes health and safety seriously.

He said: “We have responded that membership of any union, including Unite, would be a free choice matter for London Gateway employees to decide upon and if membership of one or more unions reached the level where recognition was applicable then we would be happy to do so.

“In terms of health and safety, DP World puts safety as its number one priority.

“We are not in any way against union membership and we strongly believe in freedom of choice for all staff.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Apart from the same theme being repeated 3 or 4 times in this story, the place hasn’t even opened yet and these fu**ing union parasites are already stirring trouble. Where do they think they are operating and what do they think they are operating. They’re acting like the teamsters in 1930’s Chicago. Why don’t they crawl back under their stone. They don’t give a sh1t about people’s working conditions. It’s all about money and power for them. What have the unions done and said about mass immigration that has done and will do more damage to their members than even the unions do. P1ss off and get a real job. Any moron can hold people to ransom. Just ask Bob Crow.

  2. I my own personal working experience for over forty years in the catering industry, unions have always helped me with working conditions, wage increases, free legal advice, and much more.
    In my opinion this country’s workers would still be in the dark ages without them.

  3. If unions are so great, why do we still have a minimum wage of £6.05 an hour? Why do we have people in work that still have to rely on benefits to survive? Health and safety is a laughing stock loved by insurers because they can charge ever higher premiums to employers. The badly paid are still the ones working on zero hours contracts and piece work which the unions don’t give a toss about. The unions see this port as a huge opportunity to hold vast parts of the country to ransom. Imagine when this is in full operation and the unions want to close it through strike action because one of their members stubbed their toe getting out of his car in the car park. Mass disruption countrywide. Give us our money or we’ll do it again. That’s what the unions want. Parasites.

  4. As I said before NoVoice, it was my own personal experience with the unions.
    I still believe that they have done more good than harm for the lowly working man in this country.

  5. The Unions have had a mixed history. There is no doubt that, in their early days, they were a massive force for good and did improve the lot of their members no end. Unfortunately, perhaps inevitably, they became a home for all kinds of political agitators more intent on forcing the hand of the Government of the day than securing better pay and conditions for their members. Today, I think the Unions are a mixed bag and their militancy depends on who is leading them. I don’t blame DP World for wanting to keep them at arms length but I do think a change in Union Voting laws would help. If a vote was only valid if 51% or more of the total membership voted and a strike could only be callled if 51% of those voted in favour then I am sure organisations like DP World would be more inclined to listen to what the Unions have to say. As it is, a strike can be called based on very few members voting and that can’t be right.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest

More articles